Maynooth

(Last updated by AK on 01/02/2012)

1) Studying in Maynooth

 

Websites

 

Dates and Deadlines

At Maynooth, the academic year is fully semesterised. Each semester features a total of 12 weeks of class, as well as intermittent holiday and study periods. Exam periods follow the conclusion of each 12-week semester.

In order to study at Maynooth, you will first need to complete and submit an application form to the International Office. Application deadlines for Full Academic Year and Semester One students are usually in early June. Application deadlines for Semester Two students are usually in early November.

The staff at the NUIM International Office provide an orientation programme for incoming students at the start of each semester.

Here are some important dates for you to note:

 

SEMESTER 1

Monday 12 September to Friday 16 September 2011 First-Year Registration/Orientation 
Monday 19 September 2011   Lectures commence
Monday 31 October to Friday 4 November 2011 Study Week
Friday 16 December 2011 Conclusion of First Semester Lectures
Monday 19 December 2011 to Friday 30 December 2011 Christmas Vacation
Monday 2 January to Thursday 5 January 2012  Study Period  
Not before Friday 6 January 2012 Examination Period Commences

 

SEMESTER 2

Monday 30 January 2012                                                 Lectures resume
Monday 19 March to Friday 23 March 2012 Study Week
Friday 6 April 2012 Good Friday - No Lectures
Monday 9 April to Friday 13 April 2012 Easter Vacation
Friday 4 May 2012 Conclusion of Second Semester Lectures
Monday 7 May to Thursday 10 May 2012 Study Period
Not before Friday 11 May 2012 Examination period commences

 

Grades

Each time you submit work at NUI Maynooth, you will be assigned a percentage grade. Given ranges of percentages correspond to one of six grade classes:

CLASS                                                             PERCENTAGE

First Class Honours (1st) 70 - 100                                              
Second Class Honours, Grade 1 (2:1) 60 - 69
Second Class Honours, Grade 2 (2:2) 50 - 59
Third Class Honours (3rd) 45 - 49
Pass 40 - 44
Fail 0 - 39

 

2) The Curriculum in Maynooth

Semester I
General Courses (required): AN601, AN602, AN606, AN661 - 20 ECTS

+2 “pillar” modules from: Special Topics in Anthropology 1 - 5, Comparative Contexts I, or Creole Teacher Exchange I - 10 ECTS

Semester II
General Courses (required): AN603, AN604, AN662 - 15 ECTS

+3 “pillar” modules from: Special Topics in Anthropology 6 - 10, Comparative Contexts II, or Creole Teacher Exchange II - 15 ECTS

Note: Students must accumulate 15 credits in 2/3 pillars

Summer
Intensive Programme with major essay - 10 ECTS

Semester III
Thesis Prep module - 15 ECTS

+1 module from: Special Topics in Anthropology or Creole Teacher Exchange - 5 ECTS

Semester IV
2 15-Credit Thesis Preparation Modules - 30 ECTS

 

 

3) Modules Available for Creole Students in 2011/2012

 

General Information

Students must complete 30 ECTS per semester. All modules are worth 5 ECTS, unless otherwise stated. Some modules run for a full semester (12 weeks) whereas others run for half a semester (6 weeks).

A schedule, ECTS value, and location for each class is listed in the Master in Cultural Differences and Transnational Processes timetable. The timetable is available to view/download as a PDF here. Except in the case of Research and Reading modules, students are expected to attend all lectures and seminars in each module.

Students must officially register and complete the examination for a module in order to be awarded the ECTS value assigned to that module. Modes of examination for CREOLE students are most likely to include essays and in-class presentations.

You can register for Semester One and Two modules at the start of Semester One. For those arriving in Semester Two, or for those wishing to modify their Semester Two module selections, registration reopens at the start of Semester Two.

Each module is assessed by essays of 4,000-5,000 words. Class presentations can count for up to 25% of this total.

 

Available Modules

SEMESTER 1 (Autumn 2011)


COMPULSORY MODULES

AN601a - Anthropological Theory I

AN601b - Anthropological Theory II

AN606 - Creole as a Model of Culture

AN661 - Professional Development Seminar & Ethnographic Research Practice I

 

OPTIONAL MODULES

AN611 - Comparative Contexts I

AN630 - Creole Teacher Exchange I

AN621 - Independent Reading

 

SEMESTER 2 (Spring 2012)


COMPULSORY MODULES

AN603a - Anthropological Theory III

AN604a - Anthropological Theory IV

AN662 - Professional Development Seminar & Ethnographic Research Practice II

 

OPTIONAL MODULES

AN612 - Comparative Contexts II

AN660 - Creole Teacher Exchange II

AN622 - Independent Reading

 

Students may also take the courses AN302, AN305, AN306, AN309, AN310, AN320, AN321, AN322, AN323, and AN324, descriptions of which are available here (scroll to Third Year 2011-12).

 

Note: Research and Reading Courses

CREOLE Students have the option of pursuing research for their theses by registering for 15 or 30 ECTS of Research in 15-ECTS blocs. Permission of both Maynooth and the Home institution is required for registration.  In special cases, CREOLE Students will be allowed to register for a 5-ECTS Independent Reading course (AN621, AN622), subject to approval by both the Department of Anthropology at Maynooth as well as the student’s home institution.

 

Module Descriptions

SEMESTER 1 (Autumn 2011)

AN601a Theory and Ethnographic Practice: An Introduction (Dr Chandana Mathur)
This module is the first of four 6-week intensive modules in a one-year core course for first-year postgraduates in anthropology. The purpose of these modules is to give you a solid grounding in the epistemology of anthropological theory, i.e. to help you become familiar with anthropological ways of knowing as they have developed over a considerable period of time. This module draws on classic texts from philosophy and general social/cultural theory to explore the genesis of anthropology as a discipline and form of enquiry/knowledge.

AN602a Theory and Ethnographic Practice: Classical Theory (Dr Patty Gray)
This module is the second of four 6-week intensive modules in a one-year core course for first-year postgraduates in anthropology. The purpose of these modules is to give you a solid grounding in the epistemology of anthropological theory, i.e. to help you become familiar with anthropological ways of knowing as they have developed over a considerable period of time. This particular module in the sequence deals with anthropological theory in the period from the turn of the 20th century up to around the beginning of the 1960s. Priority is given to the reading of primary sources, so that students encounter first hand the theorists' own words.

AN606 Creole as a Model of Culture
This course critically examines recent debates on the nature of culture. In the last several years concepts such as "cultural hybridity" and "creolisation" have come to the fore in anthropological attempts to deal with what appear to be new cultural forms and practices in a post-modern idiom. In an attempt to overcome what were seen as narrowly monolithic conceptions of culture, various models have been advanced which draw on "creole" linguistics and the ethnography of "creole" societies. Types of societies, languages and/or cultures considered "mixed, hybrid, creole," formerly confined to the margins of the ethnographic record, are being brought into the spotlight and even proposed as models for a new understanding of "globalised" humanity. This process has sparked a series of fairly intense debates. Have we been witnessing a process whereby once-pristine cultures are "brought into contact" under modernity, or was the entire concept of (unitary) culture an ideological fiction to begin with? To what extent is the "creole" concept of culture beholden to that which it seeks to displace?.

AN661 Professional Development Seminar: Ethnographic Research Practice 1 (tbc)
This module provides a hands-on approach to anthropological research design and proposal writing. We will review some key epistemological, ethical and methodological considerations pertinent to ethnography, and against this backdrop students will begin the process of designing and developing the proposals for their own research projects. We will examine and discuss in depth such matters as: what constitutes a field; epistemology and research design; developing a research question; preliminary research; components of a research proposal; types of proposals; strategies of drafting and revising. Through a set of writing and revising exercises, by the end of the 12 week module students will have produced a draft research proposal that will constitute the basis for further project development work in semester 2.

AN611 Comparative Contexts 1
Readings and discussion with a variety of guest lecturers focused on issues of contemporary anthropological concern.

AN630 Creole Teacher Exchange I
To be determined by lecturer.

 

SEMESTER 2 (Spring 2012)

AN603a Theory and Ethnographic Practice: Contemporary Theory (Dr Steve Coleman)
This module is the third of four 6-week intensive modules in a one-year core course for first-year postgraduates in anthropology. The purpose of these modules is to give you a solid grounding in the epistemology of anthropological theory, i.e. to help you become familiar with anthropological ways of knowing as they have developed over a considerable period of time. This module treats the development and application of the central theoretical paradigms in European and American Anthropology from the mid twentieth century. These include approaches broadly labelled postmodern and neocritical. The course will examine proponents and critics of these and other contemporary approaches through theoretical texts and exemplary ethnographies. Extensive readings from major theoretical figures and of ethnographies produced from these perspectives.

AN604a Theory and Ethnographic Practice: Doing Ethnography (Dr Pauline Garvey)
This module is the fourth of four 6-week intensive modules in a one-year core course for first-year postgraduates in anthropology. The purpose of these modules is to give you a solid grounding in the epistemology of anthropological theory, i.e. to help you become familiar with anthropological ways of knowing as they have developed over a considerable period of time. This module involves an intensive exploration of the central mode of anthropological research: ethnography. There will be a consideration of the historical development and critiques of ethnographic methods, readings drawn from a variety of ethnographies. Students will consider the applicability of various ethnographic strategies to their research problems.

AN662 Professional Development Seminar: Ethnographic Research Practice II (Dr Patty Gray)
This module provides a hands-on approach to the practicalities of carrying out anthropological field research. Students will work with the draft project proposal they produced in AN662 and grapple with the realities of how they will execute that project. This will be accomplished through reading a wide range of descriptive accounts of anthropological fieldwork from published ethnographies as well as analytical pieces discussing problematic dimensions of anthropological research; through intensive in-class-discussion; and through practical exercises. By the end of this module, the student should feel confident to begin an independent field research project.

AN612 Comparative Contexts 2
Readings and discussion with a variety of guest lecturers focused on issues of contemporary anthropological concern.

AN630 Creole Teacher Exchange I
To be determined by lecturer.

 

The timetable is available to view/download as a PDF here.